Category: Caring for Chickens

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It’s Hot – Chooks in the heat

February 1, 2020 | Caring for Chickens | No Comments

How to Help Your Chickens Survive the Heat.

It’s hot 43 and climbing. Make sure your chooks have cold water in this weather – they cool themselves by drinking cold and expelling it out in their manure. If their drinking water is hot, they will not drink it. Not drinking can result in the loss of your chickens.

Spot the barred rock chicks keeping cool.
Why Dust Bathing in the mud is not a Great Idea

Wet the earth and soil in their pen so they can get down in the wet earth and dust. Also make sure they have cool water where they are as we have lost hens who have not gone back 5 metres to their pen and the water.

It is okay to run the sprinkler on and off during the day to cool the chickens (adhering to water restrictions). It’s okay to wet chickens and if needed dunk them into a bucket of cool water to cool them off.

We freeze cups of ice to put in their waterers. We find even the little chicks in this heat want cold water and have found them sitting in their waterer or using the cold waterer on legs to pop under.

We are now carrying a range of treadle feeders to help you combat rodents accessing your chicken food. These metal treadle feeders come in 3 sizes – 5kg, 10kg & 20kg and start at $80.

5kg

Your chickens will need a week or so of training to use the feeders but then these feeder will reduce the number of rodents using your chicken pen as a snack bar.

10kg

Assembled for your convenience. Contact us to purchase.

20kg

Once every three months we recommend that you worm your chickens. We have made available Levamisole Poultry Wormer in the handy size of 2.5 grams for $6 (including postage).

The night before you want to worm your chickens, you need to take away all of their water sources about an hour before sunset so the next morning they wake up thirsty.

The following morning you mix the 2.5g of levamisole  into 4 L water. You then need to give this to your chickens to drink as their only water for the next 6 hours. This is more than enough for 20 chickens. After 6 hours or after they have consumed all of the mixture, you then need to clean out the water container and give them fresh water. They do not need to consumer all of the mixture.

We do not recommend worming on a day where the temperature is excessive or raining.

The great thing about Levamisole is that it has no egg withholding period and is made for poultry. If you use other products check to see if  they are approved for chickens or if there is an egg withholding period for the product.

Please contact us if you would like to order some levamisole concentrate: evanschickens@gmail.com

Trust me, the hens can share. You don’t need a box for each chicken. And even if you did, you would find that they would probably all use the same box anyway, We find that one nesting box for every six hens works great. These Australorps are proving that in a single nesting box you can fit three hens at once!

Spring Poultry Supplies

August 15, 2017 | Caring for Chickens, Latest News | No Comments

We are all stocked and ready to go for spring. Let us know if you would like to come by for supplies. We accept cash, credit card or EFT.  Remember to dust and worm your chickens once a quarter to keep them in prime condition. Contact us for our latest price list.

Some breeds Of chickens are more flighty than others. To hinder them flying it is possible to trim their wing.

ONLY TRIM ONE WING PER BIRD!

  1. First have someone hold the chicken for you with the wing out stretched.
  2. Look for the primary feathers.
  3. Trim them about 5 to 7 cm – remember that wings are like fingernails.  If you over trim the wing it will bleed.
  4. By cutting only primary feathers when the wing is closed your chickens still looks pretty.  Her efforts at flying will be one sided though!
  5. Clipping causes a bird to lack the balance needed for flight but lasts only until new feathers grow during the next molt, which may be a few months in young birds or up to a year for older ones.